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parties are. >> they are going with the american economy and the global economy. closer you get to the fiscal cliff, i think the less likely it is that the u.s. will be funded over and. >> okay, let me ask about tax reform. mutual political last week that a balanced approach to placing the sequester with benefits and revenues should accelerate tax reform, and i believe it's fully possible this year we work on a bipartisan basis. how does that square with the people that say that the tax reform is going to lose out because of scheduling and needing to deal with the debt ceiling and the looming sequester and house republicans concerned that if they do anything on tax reform, that they may leave themselves open to the senate not taking action. therefore, they have taken in on popular vote for no reason. >> first of all we have to solve this debt crisis in terms of sequestration and in terms of the full faith and credit of the u.s. and. we are not going to accomplish tax reform in the next six weeks. so we have a deadline that cannot basically be moved for what we need to do in the
and the economy. >> it's my pleasure to welcome you here to the brookings institution on a soggy day. it's not too hard to come in from outside on a day like this. this is the fifth growth through innovation forum that we have held at brookings but i'll give you a little background in a minute. it's the third one that we are conducting publicly. the phrase growth through innovation is an important part of the vocabulary to at brookings. we have what we call for institutional priorities under which we try to cluster all of the work that are more than 100 scholars do here. those for priorities are energy and climate, opportunity and well being, managing global change, and growth through innovation. this is i think exactly the right moment to be having today's event. we are in a period of transition in our national leadership here in the capital, of course. we have a new treasury secretary, chief of staff coming in. we'll be having a new commerce secretary, labor secretary, and, of course, the 113th congress is settling in on capitol hill. the forum is going to address the issues of how to reinvigora
than seven in ten people are dissatisfied with the present state of the economy. 60% believe we have hard times ahead. president obama swept into office, four years ago in the waive of hope, but it it seems to show that things have soured and it seems more like cope rather than hope. what happened? >> this is a different environment than it was four years ago, craig and a couple of points. president bush does come into a success term in the strong political position. his approval readings is 52% and the second-term agenda items like gun control as well as immigration and you mentioned those attitudes about the direction of the country and about the economy and this is an american public right now that lowered its standards and lowered its expectations from four years ago. in some ways that's a good situation from the obama white house and sometimes lower expectations make it easier to get achievements done, but this is a country that is still being hit by the aftereffects of the great recession and also this poll comes after the terrible tragic shooting as well as the showdown in the
in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that change affects their jobs and what they're doing to jump- start their economies which compete with one another. this could be fun. let me start with our guest. governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been working trying to control costs, get our pension funds in line, our state employees have not had a raise in four years. it has been difficult all the way around. the real challenge has been to try and turn public sentiment and get people to recognize it without a strong economy. it will not solve any of these problems. we have been relentless in what we did, the bottom
including leadership quite honestly, larry, on the economy because a bad economy, unfortunately, doesn't give us the resources we need to allow for better interventions, let's say in mental health. let's look at a fellow democrat, the democrat from colorado who came out with a proposal to stream line their processes for identifying people who may be dangerous to themselves and others and also bolster mental health measures and initiatives. >> lars larson you're going to pose everything. what do you want? >> here's the problem. the president shamelessly surrounds himself with children and used them as props. ben seems uninformed on this. this young man didn't buy his firearm. he stole it from his mother after murdering his mother. the president's proposed bill to congress to ban the manufacture and sale of new sporting rifles, semiautomatic rifles and large capacity magazines wouldn't have done a darn thing to stop sandy hook or aurora, colorado. it would have done nothing. >> let me ask you this. if it were in effect -- now i don't even know, there's issues about pistol grips and there
the economy. the economy some argue is not one of his priorities. >> if you look back in 2008 the median household income 52,546 dollars. three years into president obama's presidency the average for 2011 it dropped more than 2,000 dollars to 50,054. when you look at the numbers do you think the president should be more focused on the economy. john meachum is talking about it this morning. >> the most important g median household income over the last 12 years. without rectifiying that this will be an unmemorable presidency and potentially a significantly -- >> how is he going to do that in three years? how is he going to remedy that turn that around so the regular folks start to make more money? it seems to me almost impossible with these policies. >> i think we are all to blame here. a lot of people don't want to hear the hard truth. people don't want to pay more taxes they don't want to see these cuts. they don't want to embrace the simpson bowl kind of proposals. these are hard choices. you and i didn't run for president. he sought the job. he is a good man. i think you would agree wi
automatically because our debt is going to grow along with our economy from year to year. especially it's going to grow in times when we need to spend a little more to juice our economy. but you know, bernanke has very little credibility with the republican party because republican leadership last year actually sent letters to him saying stop with your quantitative easing and your other extraordinary measures to juice this economy. they're already angry at him, so him saying we should from the debt ceiling is not going to do anything in congress. >> part of the problem is the debt seems to go up and good times and bad times and no one ever seems to have the courage to cut it, but it's a very bipartisan thing in terms of raising it. 76 times it's been raised since 1962. and the number one president in terms of raising it, the winner is ronald reagan at 17 times. that might shock people who like to see him as the paragon of responsible spending. >> we'll start with the deficit, shrinking more rapidly than at any time since the end of the korean war. in the end of december, we had a deficit for th
similar things and have also had some success in creating more monetary policy support for the economy. >> you had mentioned that there has been evidence that the longer-term interest rates have come down to the initial round. concern is that the unemployment rate remains very high and activity would try to bring that down and one would hope to see additional movements from the most recent round. are you suggesting that one would need to be patient? needs a little bit more about how you would assess how this is having the kind of effect that you would anticipate? >> well, we will be doing that on a regular basis. we will be looking at the impact on financial markets and we will see some effect there. we will look to see whether or not the labor market situation. we first started talking about a .1% on employment, there has been some movement. there was nearly 40% of the unemployed having been out of work for six months or more. that is a situation where there are too many people i can give you specific criteria except to say that we will be assessing the impact of our actions a financi
spend on everything from education to public safety less as a share of the economy that has been true for a generation. that is not a recipe for growth. we have to do more to stabilize the finances over the medium and long-term, and also spur more growth in the short term. i have said i am hoping to making modest adjustments to programs like medicare to protect them for future generations. i also said we need more revenue for tax reform by closing loopholes for the wealthiest americans. if we combine a balanced package of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a
for our economy. so important for our public safety. so important for emergency response as we witnessed here in the northeast of the country. and so, while the fight was long and at times, unnecessary, at least the vote was taken today and we move forward. mr. garamendi: thank you, mr. tonko. the bill now is out of this house. it's already in the senate. we expect the senate to pass it probably tomorrow or the next day. certainly before the inaugural on monday and then the president will sign it shortly thereafter. bringing that kind of relief. you mentioned the jobs issue and people need to go to work. when we have these natural disasters and we come forward with the kind of support that we have seen today and will soon be available for new jersey, new york, connecticut and the surrounding areas, people go back to work. those people that have received immediate fema support for housing, for clothing, for food, that money is immediately spent into the economy. on the infrastructure side, it's crucial when the subways of lower manhattan flooded, the world's financial institution took a w
is up 5,550 points since then, just shy of the 14,000 mark. the economy is growing. instead of contracting. in the first quarter of 2009, the gdp contracted 5.3%. it grew 3.1% when the last time it was officially measured. though remains below where it was before the great recession, consumer confidence has nearly doubled. and a larger percentage of americans, 41%, according to our last poll, believe the country is headed in the right direction, up from 26% in january, 2009. on the other hand, there is plenty of data to support the idea that the drink country is not better off than it was four years ago. and that the struggling economy continues to take a toll on families. median household income is lower than it was in 2009. and 46 million americans live below the poverty line. several million more than four years ago. the federal public debt has increased from 10.6 trillion in january 2009 to 16.4 trillion now. then there's the big number that's exactly the same as it was four years ago. the unemployment rate. 7.8%. though it's down from, of course, a high of 10% in octobe
, growthing -- growing faster than the economy. we have to fix the social security system making promises that are bigger than which we can pay out down the road. .. but he recognizes the threat it putouts there in the economy in that you can't possibly imagine the real growth coming without a sense of stability. the with coming from knowing what these changes will be so you could have planning investments, job creation, all the necessary pieces of moving the economy forward. the big wild card is when people are going to make these tough choices instead of using them to fight in the normal political boxes. what is going to happen next? it's on a different path than i would have thought. if you think about the prospect theory which basically says when you're delivering good news you want to do it in lots of little pieces if they got a promotion than you want to tell them they got a raise and then tell them they got a bigger office. each piece of big news is good and makes people happier. if you were doing bad use and waiting for an airline that is going to be delayed. i think it really app
of its politics and economics and society, mexico has the 13th largest economy in the world today. $1.16 trillion. the oecd predicts in 2042, when regeneration, mexico will have his archer economy than germany's. this is not me. this is the oecd project enough things being equal. therefore notwithstanding the inequality that exists in mexico that has to be dealt with and will be dealt with over time, the fact of the matter is that texaco socially is becoming more and more middle-class society and that is reflect to and every one of the usual measures. demographically, lifestyle, in terms of fertility rate, number of students in university, quality of the housing. all of these trends have brought mexico to the point where it is becoming predominately of middle-class society and will continue to move in that direction. and third, mexico lyrically speaking is a functioning democracy. not perfect, nor is our democracy perfect. but when you look at their electoral system, if you look at the way in which freedom of the press has been moved into mexico with passion, he began to see the devel
or economy. the largest beneficiary would be california. we want to see what the cutting edge is. most of a still look for california. -- loomost of us still look to california. what governor brown said about the traditional politics is all about taking the thing in making it fresh. to a certain extent, i tried to be a writer in college. i failed miserably. a professor said everything has been set but not everything has been said superbly. even if it had, everything must be said freshly again and again. you have to see a fresh lead to a certain extent. the real issue with -- in terms of asking the president, what are the things that matter most, a bass part of those profits would be invested in california. colorado would have a significant -- pretty much every state in the country would benefit. you look at the companies based in silicon valley. they have offices, you want to expand your business, think about those young people in colorado. everything -- stated say the same thing. that money would get spent over the country very rapidly. >> thank you. governor brown. >> it is a good id
, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on the economy, social security, and medicare. caller: we the people -- [video clip] >> many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person confined independence. on the wages of honest labor, liberating families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed, when a little girl born into bleakest poverty has the same chances to succeed as anyone else because she is an american, free and equal, not just in the eyes of god, but in our own eyes. we the people still believe that every citizen deserves a measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause] we remember the lessons of our past, years spent in poverty, the parents of a child with a disability had
21 allows to continue to improve the way we make, the way we move freight that fuels our economy. map 21 streamlines and consolidates programs. map 21 helps short project delivery a priority for president obama and congress. when we deliver projects faster we deliver their benefits faster. like enhancing safety, less congestion, and a cleaner environment. the project delivery improvement included in map 21 are based on an innovate shun initiative known as every day counts. they took it from you, victor. you've done a great job with everyday counts. let's hear it for victor menendez what he has done and his team has done. thank you, victor. [applause] the concept behind everyday counts is the same as this year's trb conference. better, faster, and smarter. finally map 21 helps us keep our transportation system safe. this law gives the department for the first time oversight over transit safety. again, beg thanks goes to peter rogoff of a the train crash here in washington, peter and i sided we would commit ourselves to getting the department of transportation into the transit safety bu
of the economy not production company. neil: what bobby dwind els gends doing -- is doing, is that regressive? >> well there is that argument, but the problem is you cannot collect an income tax in the global economy that we're in today, the big corporations, simply hire lobbyists and lawyers. neil: tax out of woodwork. >> only thing we can tax is sales retail at point of sales. >> would it inhibbive sales. >> sure but we didn't spend our way to prosperity. neil: you are not saying either or. >> that is one. neil: but you would not be -- replace the federal income tax with the consumetion tax. >> i would like replace payroll tax with the consumption tax, because, the payroll tax is what is killing jobs. neil: you know low that goes. once you get a tax going it goes up and up. >> that relates to other side, social chunks is insurance is s there are no trust funds just confetti paper we'll have to lefto taxpayers some day, social insurance is a huge myth. i would means fest it, cuts by a couple00 billion, i would reduce the number of people who are av and reduce that number. we're broke. when
lawmakers accountable for what they're doing or not doing to the economy. i am the network's chief business correspondent in addition to anchoring the show. it's a title i earned covering economies and businesses and stock marks around the world. you can see me do that every weekday morning on a show called "world business today." next week, i'll be talking to some of the smartest most powerful minds in business who have an impact on your prosperity. let me show you where i'm going. davos is in the eastern part of squitser land in the swiss alps. it is the highest city in europe. a little more than 10,000 people live there, but every year some of the biggest names in business come in for the world economic for forum. it turns out to be the coldest place in europe and maybe the best place to take the temperature of the global economy. i'll be thousands of miles away but not going to forget about my job. my fox will be on what role the u.s. plays in the global economy and what 2013 is going to look like to the global business elite because their decisions will have an impact on investment and
the economy collapse. and in classic washington fashion, this is the case with the schoolhouse is on fire and rather than focusing on putting the fire out, everyone in washington runs out to use as much water. the budget deficit is the economy right now. that's the to 50 minute like that but that's the truth. i think it would be great if an organization with strength and integrity of a or b. would stand up and make the point because we're having an entire budget that is basically premised on something that is not true. >> i agree with you. we do have underlying pieces of our economy that need to get fixed. but massive change in spending and we've already cut a trillion dollars over all in spending. we've cut medicare as part of the political their act. we have to be really careful and just solving these problems by cutting spending. .. >> we do it in a way that supports families and the population that we have. >> let me just add to that. i agree with you, but unfortunately, most of the people on social security will be on fixed budgets. and so there's still a danger having out-of-pocket
, for our economy cannot be overstated. the sovereign debt of the united states, for it to be questions that we would pay our bills or not, is not a scenario that we want to go through as a country. that would really harm us. that said, as i was coming back on the train from new york, i shared this with those with me. i said you're going down this track at 130 miles an hour. what would cause the conductor, knowing that if he veers off on this next rail to the right and pulled the switch that would cause that to happen, even if he knew it would put the train at severe risk by veering off to the right, what would be the only reason a person would go off that course rather than go straight? and the reason is that there's a larger cavern, kind of a grand canyon that we are about to go off. here's what i have concluded as a businessman and a seasoned public servant. the music will stop at some point with respect to where we are. when we are pouring $1 trillion a year, 40 cents on the dollar, you cannot do that into perpetuity. the time for leadership is right now. the time to address this is
dangerous way to do it because we start playing with everybody in our economy eye lives. so if we hit the debt ceiling and we don't have a bill that changes it, when we hit somewhere around $16.4 trillion worth of gdebt, the government will have to stop spending because of the debt limit. because we take it a whole lot -- we spend a whole lot more money than we take in, the debt ceiling become as real issue pd at government has to stop spending about $100 billion a month. that means the government will have to lay off people and that will mean more unemployment and more pain for people. it also means the government won't be able to pay all 6 it bills and it may stop sending money to the businesses in the united states. some of whom could go bankruptcy because of it. >> critics have said you can list out all of the things that won't get paid respect but in the end it has a massive ripple effect. and yet the house speaker said yesterday the consequences of failing to increase the debt ceiling are real, but so, too, are the consequences of allowing our spending problem to go unresolved.
between $40 million and $50 million. the economy is not sod great. a second term and inaugural speeches the second time around not as climactic as the first time. >> a small subdued party and costs in the range of $40 million you got to wonder. a lot of money when you really think about it, isn't it? thank sow so much. >> there were ten balls last time, martha. only two balls this time oh he fixly. there was a lot of party going on last night and there will be around washington in the private bashs. >> see you there latino they are afternoon. thank you so much. >> 11:55 eastern time the official swearing in ceremony for the president will take place at the white house. later tonight the president and first lady will be at the national building museum at 8:00 eastern time to participate in candle light is celebration along with the vice president joe biden and his wife jill. they will address the nation at 8:55 eastern time later tonight and then, of course, tomorrow is a big day also. you can watch that tonight and complete coverage of our inauguration event right here on the fox news c
and hatred. our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. homes have been lost, jobs shed, businesses shuttered. our healthcare is too costly costly and our schools fail too many. each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet. these are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. less measurable, but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land. a nagging fear that america owes the decline is inevitable, but the next generation must lower its sights. today i say to you that the challenges we face are real. they are serious and they are many. they will not be met easily or in a short span of time, that know this, america -- they will be met. [cheers and applause] on this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of her pace over conflict and discord. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recri
temperature of the global economy. i'll be thousands of miles away but not going to forget about my job. my fox will be on what role the u.s. plays in the global economy and what 2013 is going to look like to the global business elite because their decisions will have an impact on investment and job creation right here in the united states. if you've got questions you want me to ask, you're unclear how the u.s. fits into the global economy right now, hit me up before i go or while i'm there. and tune in here saturdays as the 1:00 p.m. eastern, suns at 3:00. thanks for joining the conversation here on "your $$$$$" and have a fantastic $$$$$" and have a fantastic weekend. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> a beautiful day on the national mall. hello, everyone. it's 2:00 on the east coast. 11:00 a.m. out west. thank you for joining us. i'm kate bolduan. >> i'm john berman. great to see you here today. we are live in washington, d.c., covering a huge event for this city and a huge event for the entire country. president barack obama's second inauguration. >> you can just see the
on the economy. on the economy. his speech was supposed to be uplifting. republicans feel like for them to help steer the economy in the right direction, you have to get bending under control. with democrats, when they want to push jobs, it involves more stimulus spending. the two sides clash. they have never been able to pass some bills because it included stimulus that democrats wanted to pass. republicans want to get the economy going in the right direction and reduced spending. reduced federal regulations. repeal parts of obamacare. this is what job creation is about. that is part of the reason why congress is not passed these measures is because the two sides have opposite views on what it would take to create new jobs in america. that will continue. caller: i am calling in about the abortion and gay -- ia am fr contraceptives and they read killed -- date rape pills. as far as what it says in the bible, yes, it is against it. it says judge not lest you be judged. as far as the gay people go, i do not know anybody gay but i am for the rights of the gays because there are so many out there.
and diversified our economy. we decided we would be business friendly. we also did not have subprime mortgage. we did not have housing fall. foreclosures never really got serious. we kept people in their homes and kept them working. connell: we hope you enjoy the rest of your stay. dagen: we are glad the texans lost. [ laughter ] we are from the northeast. i am just kidding. thank you so much. near record low water levels in lake michigan causing cargo ships and barges to liken their loads. connell: let's go to steve now on how it can impact your wallet. >> because we have had such low water levels, it will impact your wallet. it has been dry in the region. we have had light rains in the summertime in that has produced lower water levels in all of the great lakes. if you are wondering just how low it is, we have a graphic to show you. between 87 and 97, the water drop a foot. between 94 another foot lower. it is at historic low water levels in lake michigan. cargo companies will have to carry less. >> you cannot strike bottom. you have to maintain a safe distance. when the water levels go down, w
tax cuts that would've tripled our -- crippled our economy. would also called on washington not to lose sight of what remains our top priority, job growth. we called for smarter, locally targeted investments in infrastructure. we say that training and education must be expanded to build the workforce we need for a 21st century global economy. and we call for an expanded focus on ports, exports and advanced manufacturing to great more jobs in america and reduce our trade imbalance. on all of these issues we took aggressive action. our conference of mayors engage direct with the obama administration and congress through every step of fiscal cliff negotiations. at the national press club on september 15, we released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both part
a great deal of work to be done on the economy and a great many other things. nora o'donnell, the co-anchor of "cbs this morning" is down on the national mall and she has insight on what the president is looking to in a second term. >> that's right. on a day like this when most americans have expressed their frustration with washington, political leaders, this is day that we see hundreds of thousands of americans turn out to witness this piece of history. every second-term president since dwight eisenhower has had to deal with an opposition party in congress. that's nothing new that president obama is facing in this second term. but he's going to try and capture i think some of the magic of bipartisanship on a day like today. trying to put it in a bottle. because he really has a very ambitious agenda for his second term. we have heard him talk about it. gun safety, immigration reform. deficit reduction and those looming spending cuts that are a part of the sequestration. so that's lot before the president. but as major has noted this is a speech today that's not about specifics, but
' medical facilities, and help keep the economy moving by funding necessary repairs, small business loans, and recovery aid for businesses of all sizes. my committee thoroughly examined the emergency request, listened to the needs of the people and the region, and assessed the most pressing needs to determine the funding levels paid in this bill. we crafted this legislation responsibly, giving the administration's request and the senate passed bill a hard scrub to eliminate unnecessary spending. we have removed objectionable provisions added by the senate and have adjusted funding levels to make the best use of taxpayer dollars. as we know, we face precarious fiscal times and it's essential that congress make responsible decisions to ensure efficient and effective spending. taking cues from previous efforts we have included important oversight measures to prevent abuse and ensure that federal agencies are using these funds effectively and appropriately. this is not the first major natural disaster nor unfortunately will it be the last. one of the great attributes of the american people ha
. >> we must not permit and artificial debt ceiling to throw the country into default and our economy into chaos and depression, which is exactly what the republicans are threatening to do. jon: some conservative groups warn that removing the limit is a recipe for economic disaster, as we're seeing now in greece. the leaders of heritage action family research council and club for growth writing in an op ed they want congress to balance the budget within ten years and keep it balanced. quote, no american should have to tell an eight-year-old child that we cannot get our nation's house in order by the time she goes to college. there are many ways to get to a d republicans haved both an obligation to explain what path they will choose. jonah goldberg is editor at large for national review online, he's also a fox news contributor. get rid of the debt ceiling all together? jonah, what do you think about that idea? >> well i don't think it's a disaster if we got rid of the debt ceiling but i'm not in favor of getting rid of the debt ceiling. most countries don't have a debt ceiling. you sti
? it's hard enough getting jobs right now in this economy. veterans' unemployment is a little bit higher than the national rate. then you have people who are dealing with some type of wound as they try to get back into the workforce. do we have to curry the jobs towards their skills? >> no, i don't think so. i think these disabled veterans bring lots of skills and leadership skills as well as the breadth and depth of experience they had in the services back to local communities. what has occurred is the u.s. army in 2007 asked the national organization on disabilities to help develop a solution to this problem, and they created three locations in north carolina, texas and colorado to work very closely with these stabled veterans. it was one on one with other veterans working with veterans, primarily disabled with disabled, very career-intensive veterans centric and focused on transitioning them back into civil society. the success rate has been over 70% of those veterans after 18 months have a job or they're in some sort of educational environment to include vocational training. i
're growing at 7.9%. we're barely growing our economy at 2% and we're giving them money. bill: critics say we boosted electricity output. that was productive for the united states. they don't call it outsourcing. they call it insourcing. >> you can call it whatever you want. call it whatever you like. the goal of the stimulus was to create american jobs, yes i will give them a bit of credit they will create some american jobs here. the problem, they're not long-term. they're not sustainable. the other issue you're supposed to push entrepreneurship, small business here in the united states. one of the small business renewable energy companies says we can't compete. when the money is doled out, these big firms come from europe and asia and they jump in right away and get the american money. bill: you wonder how many more stories and companies we'll hear about this? started in solyndra. $4 billion is awful lot. >> obama said 4 more billion in the budget. bill: joy. e-mail, on twitter. at bill hemmer. by. because you asked. martha: brand new numbers from the cdc how deadly this flu season is beco
, when you consider the impact of drought in the economy, in some nations in africa it has been up to 9% of the gdp of the nation's. for instance, in zimbabwe or even in kenya. so when you consider all this, i think more need to be done for preparedness and for early action. unfortunately the question is why is it the information on early, early warning, i think it's because first, drought is not a kind of charismatic disaster. it's not like tsunami or earthquake. it has little subterranean impact. second, we're experiencing more frequent drought. we are reluctant to take action on early warning because maybe they're concerned about taking action and being found wrong. so uncertainty is something that scientists alike. i think my third point also might be that one might say why should we act so early? we may undermine the capacity of committee. so when you put all these together, you may have some reasons why early warning is not leading to early action. >> thanks for the question. this issue crosses pretty much everything we are going to hear. why you said that information about the fu
have the will to the poverty a priority with in this country? >> you have to have the real economy. but we have now? i am amazed -- you could talk about public education, we could talk about health care. everyone knows that a single payer health care system would -- insurance would cover everyone. insurance companies would be gone. cost, quality, access would be at a premium in terms of our ability to be a civil society if we had a single payer health care system. we could generate almost 3 million jobs, which would serve to stimulate the rest of the economy when you are building -- and actually taking care of the people. they know that in washington. viable. -- valuable. they just want to privatize it. i think you all doing a beautiful job -- the nurses appreciate you so deeply. honestly, the progressive caucus, the black caucus -- but one of the things that you said, and i completely agree, is that you have got to push. we have got to treat a movement in this country -- occupy was a moment. it needs to start up and keep going -- it needs to bring millions of people with it. the r
decisions but to secure equal pay for equal work, it to protect medicare for seniors and to build an economy that works for the middle class. that is exactly what we should expect from washington. [applause] i am proud to say that we have a president we can count on. president obama has been taking a strong stand with the women and families on health care, equality, economic security. he appointed two fantastic women to the united states supreme court. [applause] and he chose his biggest rival to be his partner on the world stage. we are so proud of hillary clinton. [applause] president obama trusts women and women can trust president obama. we have a reason to feel good about where we stand today. with the movement we have built together, we have reason to aim high elie the years to come. -- aim high in the years to come. last cycle, we more than quintupled the size of the economy -- our community. we're using technology to open our doors to another generation of women, and men, where we meet them. we reach them where they are. we help them understand what is at stake. we added in their voi
? over 5 million new jobs, saved the auto industry, brought this economy back. it still has a long ways to go. got the star treaty approved by the united states.s. senate and remember, he did get osama bin laden, led this country on the issue of same-sex marriage, the first president to do so. pardon me, and the point is, two great women to the supreme court. now, looking ahead, that's the first question. what do you think about that first term? 866-55 press. are you yesterday? second, what do you want to see in the second term? i tell you what we are already seeing: a lot more backbone on the part of president obama. it is worken, proven by the fact that the republicans in the house caved over the weekend on the debt ceiling and said, all right. they will extend it for only three months, not good enough. they said they will extend it notno strings attached without all of the cuts to social security and medicare they had been demanding bluffs president obama, we got his back and he stays tough, gets things done in this second term. let's talk about it 866
-object detection. lease now. just $199 per month. visit choosenissan.com. road and track called sentra an economy car minus the look and feel of an economy car. wonder how civic and corolla look and feel about that. the all-new nissan sentra, with best-in-class mpg. lease for $169 per month. visit choosenissan.com. >> with the gun control debate exploding across the country. one kentucky sheriff sending a strong message to the feds. jackson county sheriff denny payman insisting you're never going to pull guns out of jackson county. how does he intend to make good of that declaration. the sheriff joins us, good evening, sir. >> good evening, how are you this evening. >> greta: very well. what happens if president obama issues some executive order and increases the control over guns or weapons? you're not going to enforce it? >> with the executive order? >> yes. >> okay. well, when i swore an oath, i swore an oath to the community. the group of people that live in jackson county. i swore an oath to the constitution, and swore oath also to the constitution of kentucky, and in that constitution is a
and track called sentra an economy car minus the look and feel of an economy car. wonder how civic and corolla look and feel about that. the all-new nissan sentra, with best-in-class mpg. lease for $169 per month. visit choosenissan.com. email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create custom emails that drive business. it's just one of the ways constant contact can help you grow your small business. sign up for your free trial today at constantcontact.com/try. ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] time and sales data. split-second stats. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ it's so close to the options floor... [ indistinct shouting, bell dinging ] ...you'll bust your brain box. ♪ all onhinkorswim from td ameritrade. ♪ >> this is a fox news alert. fox news confirming that secretary of state hillary clinton will appear before the house foreign affairs committee on january 23rd to testify about benghazi. secretary of state clinton was scheduled to testify about the libyan terror attac
that healthy ecosystems also can mean healthy economies. from louisiana, what we have taken -- what we believe is a very good first effort the addressing the vulnerabilities that exist in reducing that risk is with the state's matter of fact plan which is a long- term plan to reduce the economic significance and reduce the risk across the coast. we believe we can achieve protection for all coastal communities. it is that resource that is important. the states provide and the gulf provides to the nation, it if it is going to be afforded through the nation. we believe with this plan we can have sustainable healthy ecosystems but also healthy communities. there's an essence of -- there is a form of social engineering because if you can't ensure the communities, the supermarket, the schools, the things that the communities depend on, the communities will not survive. we want to make sure we will develop a healthy system but also healthy communities that can provide those resources. we have come a long way, it is not perfect but we have a plan to achieve this sustainability and protecting the commu
of this country, because the consequences of a default would ripple throughout the economy of. this of i just saw an article yesterday that said the people are now drawing on their retirement funds, the middle class of this country. so we now want to have a debt ceiling threat that would cause further erosion in the stock market, that would essentially make things begin to go haywire? i guess the republicans are going to be sinking this weekend how to proceed. i think they need to proceed with sensibility and common sense instead of an effort to be so extreme that you threaten the economy of the country. host: house republicans leaving for a retreat tomorrow to discuss - guest: they should retreat from the idea of using the debt ceiling. host: the referenced the wall street journal this morning. -- you referenced. many republicans see a debt limit showdown as risky. pat toomey said tuesday he would introduce legislation next reconstructing the white house caprettto prioritize the government's bills. guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have ha
for economy right? that does not seem to be just a problem just yet. >> what scares me the most is that inflation. i am not worried about the boogeyman or jayson more he's is where are my dollars today and in 40 years? if consumer price information is tame we are not losing pricing power. >> basically you can search your friends alike on facebook. investors are not too thrilled but you seem to like this. >> it is kind of a search. facebook is no wonder facebook is a search company. have you ever used yelp? >> yes and yelled is being hammered because of this announcement. >> we have not made are couple page yet. >> i am not going to go to yell, i will go to you on facebook to see what your favorite restaurant is. when you get into a situation where you say you like lord of the rings i will trust you more than the chronicle's review. i don't of the chronicle has a review but the point being is i trust my friend's information and referrals more than i trust what i see on a yelp or other web sites like that very >> what is good about that is that it keeps people on facebook even lon
is a bundle of joy for california's economy. a future worker. a future taxpayer, and a future buyer for your home. trouble is, there aren't enough women having babies. that spells potential crisis for the future of the state. >> i want to get married, have a career, all these things. most of my friends feel the same way. i think our generation wants to wait longer. we don't really see ourselves with kids in our 20s. >> maybe it's the economy. people with making sure they have enough for themselves first. >> we peaked in california in 1990. >> reporter: dell myers from usc sees a convergence of troubling trends. on top of a declining birthrate, there is a growing senior population. that means a shortage of doctors and caregivers in the supply pipeline to serve the aging. >> basically, there's almost twice as many seniors now per working-age person, or there will will, than tha there have been traditionally. >> reporter: aggravating factors are declining education opportunities and a higher cost of living in california. fewer people are coming to the state, including undocumented workers. myer
that? is there enough tax generated in the economy to offset that? and would disaster occurs are you on the hook for off infrastructure and everything else that may be required to rebuild that community? and asia return on that exposure -- is your return greater? as a taxpayer, the answer is unfortunately too often know. we have subsidize risks to the point where as long as no extreme event occurs, it seems okay. but when the extreme event occurs, you are now exposed to much greater costs without necessary generating revenue or other societal benefits off that risk. now, during the '70s and '80s and through the early '90s, went a lot of growth was taking place in coastal areas and other vulnerable areas, very few storms were occurring. frequency was down. so the allusion was i have lived here for 30 years, this never happens. welcome the problem with climate whether it's 30 year cycles are like an eyelash in understanding how big systems and dynamics work. not talking at any of the forcing issues, and now we find ourselves in this period of increased activity and you are sitting on t
. martha: they have been doing okay. bill: so far. martha: a lot of people in the economy don't feel okay but companies are making out fine with the earnings. meantime lawmakers on capitol hill getting back to the business of the nation and spending. >> we need to solve these problems. it reminds me of the old jimmy buffet song, if the phone doesn't ring it must be me. like waiting for the senate to pass a budget. martha: what the president's call will mean for future budgets and taxes. the sea change we could be seeing now from the reagan years. >> we must take further steps to permanently control government's power to tax-and-spend. we must act now to protect future generations from government's desire to spend its citizens money and tax them into servitude when the bills come due. let us make it unconstitutional for the federal government to spend more than the federal government takes in. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional inv
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